Stephen McNeillBorn in 1958, Canadian fine art photographer and printmaker, Stephen McNeill, grew up in a small town near Toronto. At 16, he signed up for a night school course in photography and was asked to shoot a roll of film for his first assignment. He borrowed a Kodak Instamatic camera and fired off the film cartridge in his backyard. Weeks later, the students were given a lesson on the Solarisation technique. He was hooked.

After high school graduation, he landed a short-term job as a darkroom assistant at a weekly newspaper. He also explored the art scene and voluntarily took on photography assignments to gain experience. In 1978, he directed and produced The Grand Illusion, a presentation that combined photography, mime and live music, which was the first public exhibition of his art. A year later, he moved to Toronto and apprenticed in the graphics industry as an imaging specialist. It was here he met photographer and wit Wes Hattey, who became a mentor to the fledgling artist. Through these experiences, McNeill developed the skills necessary to become established in the visual arts.

Throughout his career, McNeill’s had an affinity for black and white imagery and alternative photographic processes. He is one of the few accomplished darkroom printers still working today. Lectures, workshops, private tutoring and writing assignments provide platforms for him to share a voice in this regard. He continues to contribute work to private collections, galleries, performance artists, publications and educational and charitable institutions.

Stephen McNeill

Born in 1958, Canadian fine art photographer and printmaker, Stephen McNeill, grew up in a small town near Toronto. At 16, he signed up for a night school course in photography and was asked to shoot a roll of film for his first assignment. He borrowed a Kodak Instamatic camera and fired off the film cartridge in his backyard. Weeks later, the students were given a lesson on the Solarisation technique. He was hooked.

After high school graduation, he landed a short-term job as a darkroom assistant at a weekly newspaper. He also explored the art scene and voluntarily took on photography assignments to gain experience. In 1978, he directed and produced The Grand Illusion, a presentation that combined photography, mime and live music, which was the first public exhibition of his art. A year later, he moved to Toronto and apprenticed in the graphics industry as an imaging specialist. It was here he met photographer and wit Wes Hattey, who became a mentor to the fledgling artist. Through these experiences, McNeill developed the skills necessary to become established in the visual arts.

Throughout his career, McNeill’s had an affinity for black and white imagery and alternative photographic processes. He is one of the few accomplished darkroom printers still working today. Lectures, workshops, private tutoring and writing assignments provide platforms for him to share a voice in this regard. He continues to contribute work to private collections, galleries, performance artists, publications and educational and charitable institutions.